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"My So-Called (Athletic) Life

By Stacey Wagner (Guest Author)

Do you ever get mistaken for a movie star, television personality or political crusader? Me neither.  But I do get mistaken, occasionally, for an athlete.  Of course, that could be because I am often wearing branded cycling gear and riding a $3,000 road bike. And because I keep training for races even though I am not, in my mind, competitive.  And I stopped team racing several years ago

Yet I can't help myself – the thrill of defeat that follows my anticipation of victory has turned me into a woman of a certain age longing to become Evelyn Stevens, a star of the women's road racing circuit – a woman who, one year, was a Wall Street Associate and the next was a competitive cycling sensation.   I want to be like her or at least someone who looks like her, which in my case may be a bit more attainable.  After all, we are both women!

A decade ago, as my daily jog turned into a grinding symphony of flattening vertebrae and twisted ligaments, I cast about for a substitute exercise that would keep my serotonin high and my weight low.  Cycling was not, however, that substitute.  Instead, I chose weightlifting, which in hindsight was good for my cycling, but at the time made me feel like a “plump when you cook it” hot dog.  My muscles were bigger, but my clothes were tighter and that just wasn't working for me.

So, I decided to take a spinning class at the local gym. That seemed fun and made me sweat, but honestly, it felt a little silly – like trying to dance while on a bike that didn't take you anywhere or even get you on American Idol.  And then, one day, while I was getting ready to spin to yet another remix of “I Will Survive”, I ended up in a class taught by an actual cyclist, not an aerobics instructor. And she took us through a training routine to build strength and endurance for cycling.  Et voila!  I was on to my present obsession. 

Well, it took a few more years, but it was the start of my love affair with cycling.  And – truth be told – it mirrors the trajectory of all my other love affairs:  mad, passionate devotion only to become aware that if I wanted this to work, I was actually going to have to work at it.  And, there would be no guarantee of success.  But this instructor turned out to be just the person I needed then and who I need now.  Leticia Long, of Wired Cycling, has been my instructor for ten years now – through my own personal good times and bad – and the science behind her instruction and training have paid off.  My physician believes I am as fit as someone 20 years younger than myself.  And this means that as I age, I can continue to do the things I love – biking is one of those things but also traveling and working on my house.

I'm really not sure why I like biking so much, except maybe it’s the wind in your face that makes you feel as if you are going really fast, and a sense of freedom and power from knowing you are fit enough to ride the big hills.   So, while I'm not a real athlete, I like to play one every day, and if you see me out there on the road, or even in a Wired class, feel free to mistake me for Evelyn Stevens.


Spring: The Perfect Time to “Awaken” Your Symphony to Get a Better You

There’s nothing like the beauty of spring flowers or a warm, end-of-winter breeze to awaken your inner orchestra. This orchestra—your orchestra has many wonderful instruments such as determination, focus, and intention. Sometimes the shorter days and gray skies of winter keep our instruments dormant. This spring why not let the renewing powerfulness of nature awaken our instruments so that we can create a symphony of change; both within ourselves and in our communities.

5 Tips to Keep Your Instruments Tuned:

1.     Reboot your brain—Try to avoid decision fatigue by creating a schedule for your workouts. Then stick to it.

2.     Recharge your body—Get a relaxing massage; it will help you think better.

3.     Rest your mind—Turn off the screens—all of them; no cheating.

4.     Manage the effects of daylight savings—Get a good night’s rest.

5.     Be still—Absorb the beauty and energy of spring a mental extension of your daily thoughts.

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Autumn: Let's train and thrive

fall in dc
Autumn begins on September 22. Use the 92 days of the Autumn Season to get your best health! We're offering $15 off any class package from September 17-September 22. Use promo code: "Train and thrive" at www.wiredcycling.com/pricing.

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August: The Perfect Time to Recalibrate Your Ambition!


Whether it’s the number on the scale, your ranking and stats in your last class at Wired, or the feeling in your lungs after a short run, use August to recalibrate your ambition.

Never mind what you have or haven’t achieved, what could you be doing? Step back and ask yourself what change would you like to see by August 31. Interested in joining a group to get started?  Join our 31 Day Fitness & Nutrition Challenge for great info and advice.  

Need help setting specific goals and realistic deadlines? Email Leti Long at letilong@wiredcycingdc.com to schedule a free assessment.
 
 
 
 

A Book Recommendation for Women

While, Wired has only been around for 3 years,  I've spent my entire career focused on health and wellness. And, I can honestly say that not a single week has passed without at least one woman telling a story of how their perception of themselves is shaped by their weight (and age). Recently, at a party a woman told me that she "hated her body." Just recalling her face and the self-imposed internal struggle makes me sad. 

As you know, culture and trauma are only a few of the many forces that can steal a woman's access to her true power and beauty. I'm always looking for tools and resources to help women celebrate their bodies and their lives. With that in mind, I want to let you know about "Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body, an important and insightful book from Roxane Gay. 


“When you’re overweight, your body becomes a matter of public record in many respects. Your body is constantly and prominently on display. People project assumed narratives onto your body and are not at all interest in the truth of your body, whatever that truth might be. Fat, much like skin color, is something you cannot hide, no matter how dark the clothing you wear, or how diligently you avoid horizontal stripes.”

--Roxane Gay, author of Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body






Igniting Your Proactive Self

When it comes to getting your best body, do you say to yourself, “One of these days?”
How many times have you said to yourself, “What are you waiting for?” Yet, time marches
on while your busy schedule keeps you from achieving your fitness goals.

Being proactive with your fitness and health begins with your decision to do something
specific and intentional. Otherwise, you’re just “hanging back” from your ability
to be fit & healthy, less stressed, and awesome!

 At Wired, with a supportive environment, science-based training,
and performance measuring technology, we can help you find more balance between
your “observational self” and your “proactive self.”  We believe that small steps
that are measured and evaluated lead to big changes. Our classes allow you to
track your performance, heart rate, and calorie count during class,
followed by an automatic email to you with your results to help you
keep track of your fitness history.

Come to Wired and take ownership of your fitness goals—It’s okay to be
“All about you when it comes to your health!”

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46-Day Breakup from Sugar/Carbs Challenge (March 1 to April 15, 2017)  


Kicking off our 3rd Week – Wednesday, March 15

Yesterday, I was asked if I were still on the “46-day diet.” I replied, “It isn’t a diet, rather, a renewed commitment to better self-care and self-protection.” As we all know, we are wired for self-protection. Just think about the time when you had to brace yourself because you thought a friend or family member drove too fast or took a last minute push through an intersection on a yellow light. It is our natural inclination to be safe from harm—to avoid danger.

Yet, somehow, the taste of great carbs and sugar seem to overpower our natural instincts and personal desire to live without disease. So, as we move forward on this journey, let’s keep in mind that with our need for self-protection and our focus on self-care, we have the tools we need to remain vigilant about our health and wellness.

--Leticia Long, Owner & Founder

 

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